Unrestricted Funds…To Give or Not to Give

I want to reflect on the unique opportunities (and challenges) that VISIONS faced over the last fiscal year, which closed in July.  We saw an unprecedented demand for our diversity, equity and inclusion work, while juggling the constantly-evolving realities of operating during a global pandemic. VISIONS needed to move swiftly yet be mindful. Be responsive,…

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My tears burn

My tears burn My hearts on fire We try to answer this wicked question With a simple answer So much anger Underneath all sadness All shame We cannot talk about We will not talk about Because those moments our opposing opinions Bring too much pain Where is the line When do I stand And say…

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Statement on 20th Anniversary of 9/11

September 11, 2001 changed the US  forever. A total of 2,977 lives were lost in New York City, Washington, DC, and outside of Shanksville, Pennsylvania, and thousands more were injured.  Many more first responders and civilians alike battled illnesses believed to stem from the contaminated air at or around the site, as well as post-traumatic…

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A VISIONS Q&A on Critical Race Theory

  Two VISIONS consultants share their insights about Critical Race Theory and how our broader community may be able to redirect this important discussion. Jen Rose Heifferon (JRH) is a Learning Specialist and Multicultural Leadership Team Co-Facilitator at the Presidio Hill School and an Associate Consultant at VISIONS. Alec MacCleod (AM) is a teacher at…

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Thoughts on Critical Race Theory

Talking about Critical Race Theory (CRT) can be challenging. Outside of academia, a wide array of definitions and biases exist. Perceptions become widespread and we find ourselves having a discussion that is built upon some significant misperceptions. Consider Encyclopedia Britannica’s definition: an intellectual movement and loosely organized framework of legal analysis based on the premise…

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Juneteenth

Juneteenth marks an important milestone in the U.S.’ ongoing pursuit of “liberty for all.” June 19, now celebrated as Juneteenth, honors the day in 1865 when the last of the enslaved in Galveston, TX were told they were free.  Long acknowledged and celebrated by African Americans, the poignancy of this day has become more widely-acknowledged…

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Reflecting on the past year – one year since the death of George Floyd

It has been exactly one year since George Floyd was killed by police officer Derek Chauvin. The world reacted to his needless death through an outpouring of emotions and actions, an awakening to the racism and social injustices that still exist today and the work that still needs to be done by every single one…

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Reflections on the conviction of Derek Chauvin

Yesterday, we learned the jury found former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin guilty on all charges – second degree murder, third degree murder, and second degree manslaughter, for the death of George Floyd. He faces up to 40 years in prison, and we eagerly await what his sentence will actually be. Will it be the…

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Asian American Invisibility & Ending the Culture of “忍”

the character commonly translated to mean: to persevere

忍 the character commonly translated to mean “to persevere”. But it also means to endure, tolerate, and conceal. It is considered a virtue in Chinese & Japanese cultures. 忍者 – a person who perseveres – also means ninja. I am angry. I don’t get angry very often. In fact, I almost never get angry because…

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